dreamingbear (dreamingbear) wrote in 50bookchallenge,
dreamingbear
dreamingbear
50bookchallenge

Book #18: Darkly Dreaming Dexter

Title:Darkly Dreaming Dexter*
Written by:Jeff Lindsay
Format:Audiobook
Narrated by:Nick Landrum
Genre:Mystery, Suspense, Dark Comedy(?)


Jeff Lindsay is one of the most exciting voices to explode onto the literary scene in quite some time. From his boundless imagination comes the tale of a serial killer like no other, hailed by Booklist in a starred review as "one of the genre's most original, compelling characters to appear in years."

Dexter Morgan appears to be the perfect gentleman. He is handsome and polite, and has been in a relationship for nearly a year and a half. Yet appearances can be deceiving, for Dexter is a serial killer who has slain many people. But in this tale, he's the good guy, for there is one little twist: Dexter only snuffs out other murderers. When another serial killer, with an eerily similar style, starts grabbing headlines, Dexter has a fairly morbid thought. Am I being challenged?

Darkly Dreaming Dexter is macabre yet wickedly funny, a wildly inventive novel that entertains from beginning to end.


It's dark, disturbing, devious, daring, and quite funny. I was surprised to find myself laughing out loud to some quips in the book. [Oh, and, yes, Dexter himself loves playing on alliteration with his own name.] Dexter is telling the story, so you see the full depth of how he thinks... It's a fascinating look at the mind of a sociopath and, while I don't know how well I could deal with it in real life, I adore Dexter's absolutely frank, unbiased, unsympathetic look on people in general. His observations are dry, wry and witty, especially when trying to lead another character to an idea or conclusion.

It's also fascinating how he saw that dark side of himself as a separate creature within his own mind - his dark passenger. He also talked as if he had no control over what this passenger would do. He spoke as if someone else were literally driving the Dexter-bus and how he, as the voice of rationality, if not reason, were relegated to being the passenger. It's a very astute observation of an episode or as I like to call it, "being symptomatic of the illness."

It's so good I want to listen to it again.


18 / 75 books. 24% done!
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments