ningerbil (ningerbil) wrote in 50bookchallenge,
ningerbil
ningerbil
50bookchallenge

Books 20 and 21

20. The Death and Life of American Journalism, by Robert W. McChesney and John Nichols. This is a must-read for journalists and anyone wanting to save the field and restore it to its Fourth Estate watchdog status. The authors take a thorough look as to what is wrong with newspapers (really, all for-profit generalized mass media but the focus is on the newspaper), where things went wrong and, most importantly, how to bring them back. As to what is wrong, several of the problems McChesney and Nichols point to are issues I've brought up for years. A big problem is that the for-profit, commercial model is falling apart and cannot (and should not) be resurrected. The authors have a greater body of history and research than I do, and show that this model, started about 150 years ago, has been problematic from the start, although only now are the wheels starting to come off. McChesney and Nichols lay out why commercially-run media was a problematic situation, and why technology will not salvage it. But the sections I liked best were the solutions. This is the first book I've read on the subject that actually presents real-world and workable solutions, as opposed to pipe dreams. Essentially the solution is to go back to what our Founders had wanted and spoke for (the authors cite many examples): a heavily subsidized news media. The concept of the L3C corporate status- a fairly new status right now only recognized in a few states- seems especially tailor-made for media. It would allow media to remain for-profit under stringent guidelines. The L3C is for a low-profit entity with a social benefit. The company could could qualify for subsidies and could even apply for grants while still making a profit, as long as its social message is clear. I hope this avenue is explored and takes root. The consequences of remaining at the status quo would be dire, as the authors also illustrate. There are many citations, graphs and charts to back up what the authors say. Now, the big issue of course is will anyone listen. The cynic in me is doubtful. I hope I am proven wrong. McChesney and Nichols provide the tools and ideas- now they just have to be acted upon.

21. A Raisin in the Sun, by Lorraine Hansberry. This one fills the Book Riot challenge for reading a classic by a person of color. This one almost felt like a cheat; I've seen this twice, plus I've also not only seen Clybourne Park, a 2010 spinoff of Raisin, I was in charge of props for a second, local production. Still, there's always value in reading a script for a show you've seen, and the forward was worth the read in and of itself. I came to appreciate the humanity of the piece, which stands the test of time because it is such a human story. The play focuses on the Younger family: three generations living in a run-down apartment in Chicago. Their lives change when the matriarch receives a $10,000 check, which brings out the best and worst in all of them. The audience learns of their dreams, hopes and fears, set in a backdrop of discrimination, which shows when Lena decides to take some of the money to purchase a home in a white neighborhood. All in all, it's a great play that deserves the classic title. A pity Hansberry died so young. She was quite prolific in her 34 years; I can't help wonder how much more she could have done if she had longer. Still, grateful to what she was able to do. A Raisin in the Sun is a gem.
Tags: non-fiction, play
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