Gavin F (gavluvsga) wrote in 50bookchallenge,
Gavin F
gavluvsga
50bookchallenge

Book #56: Moirai by Ruth Silver



Number of pages: 219

This is the second in a trilogy of novels that started with Aberrant, which I read a year or so ago.

In the first book, the main characters - Olivia (the book's narrator) and her husband Joshua - escaped from the capital city into the outlands to find a community where they could be accepted. The first book ended with a hint that the series was leading up to a Hunger Games-type rebellion.

This book includes:

[Spoiler (click to open)]

Olivia meeting her father in the biggest twist (because she thought he was dead, and there is an explanation provided for this later on). The moments between Olivia and her father also provide the best moments of drama.

A rebellion in the Capital City near to the end, an event that I did not expect to take place until the final book; it was surprising to see the plot being moved forward quicker than it seemed likely to.

After the rebellion, it feels almost like there is no scope for a third book, until the final chapter when Joshua ends up being kidnapped by the authorities.



I wasn't too sure about this book at times; there were a few too many discussions about the politics of the world in which the trilogy is set (a lot of it involved children being forcibly removed from their parents); I found it best not to get too fixated with this and enjoy the events that were described in the narrative.

I also noticed that the book introduced a character who seems to be the main villain (sort of equivalent to the Hunger Games' President Snow), who will probably take on a bigger role in the third book, Isaura.

Overall, I didn't think it was quite as good as the previous book , and the narrative felt a bit rushed at times; some ideas (a brief mention of telepathic powers) seemed like they weren't explored enough. However, the ending did make me want to keep reading and buy the final book in the trilogy at some point.

Next book: Skagboys (Irvine Welsh)
Tags: book review, contemporary, fiction, sci-fi
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