Ratty (blinger) wrote in 50bookchallenge,
Ratty
blinger
50bookchallenge

Book 27 - 2017

Book 27: The Art of Frugal Hedonism: A guide to spending less while enjoying everything more by Annie Raser-Rowland with Adam Grubb – 226 pages

Description from bookdepository.co.uk:
It sounds too good to be true. You can save money and the world, inoculate yourself against many of the ills of modern life, and enjoy everything more on both the sensual and profound levels? Preposterous!
Yet here is a toolkit to help you do just that. A tweak here, a twiddle there; every strategy in The Art Of Frugal Hedonism has been designed to help you target the most important habits of mind and action needed for living frugally but hedonistically. Apply a couple, and you'll definitely have a few extra dollars in your pocket and enjoy more sunsets. Apply the lot, and you'll wake up one day and realise that you're happier, wealthier, fitter, and more in-lust with life than you'd ever thought possible.


Thoughts:
So a few years ago, a friend and colleague of mine decided that she was going to make protecting the environment her hobby/mission. This included reducing her own family’s impact, but also encouraging others to do so as well. She started this by creating a facebook group (‘Urban Hippies’ if you’re interested), and as I sit next to her five days a week and she’s very bossy, she has had a real big impact on me. She knows I’m a reader, so when she finds books that connect with her mission, she often shares them with me. This one particularly resonated, and I’m really glad I got to read it. I don’t believe in everything the authors have to say (I won’t be dumpster diving any time soon), but the idea that one can and should find what really matters to them and invest their time and money in that rather than trying to keep up with the Joneses by buying, buying, buying. By taking this approach, one can actually reduce their time invested in things they don’t like, particularly work, in order to fund things they don’t care about. I have been trying to encourage this approach with my family (my mother in particular - raging consumer!), and I’m pleased to say my siblings have really taken it on board (I think we always had tendencies to this anyway). What I have noticed is that those of my friends (and family) who have the access to funds in order to live comfortably (i.e. make a decent wage) are actually the ones most focused on reducing their impact and limiting their consumption. Those friends with limited means seem to always be the ones chasing the latest trend, or complaining they haven’t got enough, or being wasteful. It’s an interesting comparison. Anyway, irrespective of the current climate issues, I think its always important for us, as humans, to try to reduce our impact on the planet, for future generations, and in light of our eventual migration to the stars, where we won’t always have access to seemingly limitless resources. This book provides some really interesting thoughts on how to do that. I recommend all should read it.


27 / 50 books. 54% done!


11167 / 15000 pages. 74% done!

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Tags: economics, food, gardening
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